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    Irish Surname Resources

    Are you an O’Mally or an O’Neil?

    If you are a genealogy beginner in search of Irish surname resources you are in luck because you are among the millions of fortunate family tree fanatics who can draw from a wide variety of genealogy resources.

     

     

    To get started you might want to check out this fantastic Irish Surname Infographic which gives an at-a-glance overview of the top twenty most common Irish surnames.

    Other information you can find on the Continue reading “Irish Surname Resources” »

    An Irish Culinary Tradition – Edible Seaweeds

    September 14, 2008 by  
    Filed under Articles, Family History, Preserving Your Family Tree, Public Records

    I grabbed this recipe from The Ballycastle Blog: Irish Genealogy and More. Found it so interesting I thought I’d share it with you. The time of the Great Hunger or (The Gotta Mór); Ireland 1845-7, was a bleak time in Irish history. With widespread crop failures and disease that devastated an already weakened people, seaside communities could turn to the sea and thus managed a little better. While men fished, women with their children in-tow hunted the beaches during low Continue reading “An Irish Culinary Tradition — Edible Seaweeds” »

    An Irish Culinary Tradition – Edible Seaweeds

    September 11, 2008 by  
    Filed under Blank Family Tree

    I grabbed this recipe from The Ballycastle Blog: Irish Genealogy and More. Found it so interesting I thought I’d share it with you.

    The time of the Great Hunger or (The Gotta Mór); Ireland 1845-7, was a bleak time in Irish history. With widespread crop failures and disease that devastated an already weakened people, seaside communities could turn to the sea and thus managed a little better. While men fished, women with their children in-tow hunted the beaches during low Continue reading “An Irish Culinary Tradition — Edible Seaweeds” »

    Broaden Your Ancestor’s Name Search

    To trace the Irish origins of a client’s Irish grandfather, I recently searched a number of government record databases. The Irish grandfather’s name was Thomas Hogan. Feeling confident in pinpointing the specific person, I entered the first name, Thomas, and the family name (surname), Hogan, in the search fields of the searchable database. My confidence quickly diminished, when, unfortunately, the search results did not produce the one and only Thomas Hogan I was looking for. Being patient and persistent, I Continue reading “Broaden Your Ancestor’s Name Search” »